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Normware

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Norman Schweitzer
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Well I was considering switching systems to something lighter (Olympus). I have been finding that the weight of the r5 with grip (and without) 100-500mm lens was getting too hard to deal with. Went to the local camera store to look at other offerings. I mentioned that I could be selling all my R5 gear, and was immediately surrounded by the other sales staff (mostly Canon shooters), inquiring how much and when could I bring it in. They asked why and I explained that weight - hand holding the camera and lens, was getting to be too much. One of them asked "don't you usually use a monopod with your 100-500?". He was right I do use monopod with that combo. I have a 16mm 50mm and the 24-240mm. so really the weight was an issue with the 100-500 and my Sigma 12-24mm Art lens only.

Guess I am staying with the R5 for a little while longer. But that new Olympus om-1 sure looks good (The menu system resembles the canon menu).
 

Timothy Mayo

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Glad to hear that you will be staying with Canon for now Norman! :) But yes, the OM-1 is definitely a nice bit of kit that I know is tempting many Canon, Sony and Nikon Shooters.
 

Kwazy

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Mike
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I bought an OM-1 in addition to my R6 after doing some research and learning that the Micro Four Thirds (MFT) format is better for macro (more magnification, greater depth of field, etc), and OM-1 is the hot new thing.

I love that little camera. The kit (camera, lens, flash, diffuser) is probably 5 times lighter compared to the R6 with the 100mm Macro lens and a flash unit, and I can easily shoot it with one hand while holding the twig or flower with the bug on it with my left. Was getting wrist pain trying to do the same with the R6. The (non-pro) lenses for MFT are much cheaper too. Got a 75-300mm which is 150-600mm full frame equivalent for $300. The quality and speed is not anywhere near R5+500mm, but it's decent for an amateur. The current macro 60mm lens is neat, but they're also working on a 90mm (180mm FF equiv) that's due some time in 2023, and that Pro IS lens should be VERY exciting. Feature-wise it does pretty much everything the Canons do, including the R7's burst mode (with buffering). The computational modes are an awesome addition; the (tripod-only) 80 megapixel mode is fun to play with (can be hit or miss depending on how still everything is), and the few other ones really make me wish Canon did a firmware update to include them in all of their cameras. The camera and the pro-version lenses are also dust and weather proof.

Now, on the flip side - it does very poorly in low light, and shooting at ISO above 1000 really affects the image quality. Overall image quality is noticeably better on the R6 as well, at least straight out of the camera before any denoising. So while I initially considered selling the R6, I ended up keeping it for when I'm not shooting bugs or birds, and will consider using Canon for macro again when the 100mp version comes out, as long as it's not prohibitively expensive. I'd say R5 with 100-500mm is better for birding, but that lens is literally 10x the cost of the 75-300 m.zuiko, so the OM-1 could be the budget alternative while offering a bit of extra reach as well.

Sorry for turning this into an Olympus advert on a Canon forum, but it is a very fun camera that has its advantages and some limited overlap with Canons, yet does not replace them. You certainly "dodged a bullet" if you have no interest in macro and like to shoot high quality photos in low light.
 

Dave Williams

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Dave Williams
Must admit as I have got older weight has become a major factor in deciding what gear I now own. Not long ago I was happily walking around with a 1DX2, a 600mm f4 Mk2 and a Gitzo tripod with a Wimberley attached. An operation on my spine dictated the need to think again.
The R5 and the 100-500 have been a revelation. I sold the 600mm and the 1DX2 but hung on to both my 500mm f4Mk2 and the tripod set up although I rarely use them. The new mirrorless set-up is so lightweight I don't even need a tripod anymore, well not for the time being anyway. I'm heading towards 72 so I wonder at what stage I'm going to start having to think again but at the moment it's certainly not even on the horizon.
 

Ed Cordes

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Ed Cordes
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I have just completed selling all my Canon DSLR gear in the total transition to the RF mirrorless system. My last DSLR was a 7D2 and used the 500 F4 and 100-400 II most of the time. I was fortunate enough to get an early R5 and 100-500 right after they were introduced. Fell in love with the light weight and image quality. My wife just got an R7. So now our entire kit is RF 14-35, RF 24-105 and RF 100-500. Gail uses the adapted EF 100-400. The freedom of handholding and overall light travel weight is unbelievable.
 

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Copterdoc

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Frank H Tucker
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Just a perspective. When I got my R5 it was with the intent of investing in a family of great lenses that would have lasting value and utility. I'm well on the way in that regard. I'm looking forward to the rumored "autofocus tilt=shift" lenses to add to my family of tools. What I perceive as most important is the quality and utility of the lenses. In the overall scheme of things, the investment in lenses will most often surpass any investment in the camera body. So when I chose the Canon R5, I expected that over time I would upgrade the camera body as the tech and software advanced. It's easy to look at the newest "whiz-bang" offering from others and if you have a need or are just plan wealthy enough to service the technology envy it is absolutely your privilege to do so. I have found that for one, you should not let this craving for the newest bright shiny thing stop you from getting some technology and continuing to develop your skills. The marketing of cameras, computers, cars, etc., is designed to cause in most cases a superficial desire to "have the best". To have the fastest car, the biggest boat, the most gigantic lens. Often for those of us with less disposable resources, the best approach is to do your research not just on the bleeding edge tech but the associated peripherals and such that you will need to progress in your art and craft. That is in my view the best way to approach the acquisition of a new camera and its accessories.

I based my decision not just on the capabilities of the camera body but the historically successful longevity of the Canon EF series of lenses, many of which function flawlessly on this R5 body.

JMHO ;)
 

Ed Cordes

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Copterdoc, you are absolutely correct re the value of lenses and their staying power compared to camera bodies. I switched to mirrorless because of the tremendous capabilities it has over the DSLR. EVF, blazingly fast and accurate AF, and the ability to place the histogram in the viewfinder among other things. Since my wife and I both shoot, it became difficult for her to shoot with the 7D2, not having these advantages while I had them in the R5. She was resistant to spending the $ on another R5, so when the R7 came out it seemed like a good fit. As it turns out it is perfect for her. Jumping back to the lens discussion - my old trusty 500 F4 was purchased in 2005 and traveled the world with me - literally. At 75 years old it was just getting too heavy and cumbersome, so I decided to take the plunge and try the RF 100-500. Great decision. Yes I have f 7.1 instead of F4. However, this is more than offset by the light weight, lack of need for a tripod and gimble mount and the high ISO capability of the R5 and Topaz DeNoise AI.
 

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